Physiotherapy Treatment, Physiotherapists, Physiotherapy, Ajax, Pickering, Whitby, Durham Region, Sante Group HealthCare

Physiotherapy Treatment, Physiotherapists
In Ajax, Pickering, Whitby and Durham Region

Physiotherapy Treatment, Physiotherapists, Physiotherapy, Ajax, Pickering, Whitby, Durham Region, Sante Group HealthCare

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Physiotherapy Treatment, Physiotherapists In Ajax, Pickering, Whitby and Durham Region

Physiotherapy treatment is an established, respected and evidence-based profession, which uses scientifically proven techniques to help many conditions.

Physiotherapists treat many conditions including:

  • TMJ syndrome
  • Sports injuries
  • Back & neck pain
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Stress incontinence
  • Work-related injuries
  • Spinal and joint arthritis
  • Cancer and palliative care
  • Pregnancy related back pain
  • Cerebral palsy and spina bifida
  • Post accident treatment & rehabilitation
  • Brain injuries (strokes, traumatic brain injury)
  • Cardiac & Respiratory conditions such as asthma, emphysema, obstructive airway diseases (COPD)

Santé Group Physiotherapy Brochure

Is an MD referral needed for Physiotherapy treatment?

No referral is necessary to participate in physiotherapy treatment. However, patients are advised to check the details of their extended health benefits as some plans may require a physician's referral in order to get treatment costs reimbursed.

If you have extended health benefits, have been injured as a result of an automobile accident, or have a claim under WSIB, then you will likely have all of your treatment paid for. If you are using extended health benefits, check the details of your coverage in your Extended Health Manual, or speak with your Human Resources department. Physiotherapy is covered by most health insurance plans.

Please check with your provider.

What is Physiotherapy?

Physiotherapy is the primary health care profession that promotes wellness, mobility, and independent function. Physiotherapy is dedicated to enhancing and restoring mobility. With enhanced mobility and freedom to move, one feels better and gains more enjoyment from life.

Physiotherapists have advanced understanding of how the body moves, what keeps it from moving well, and how to re-store mobility.

Physiotherapists have the education, applied knowledge and treatment techniques to help:

  • improve and maintain physical mobility and independence
  • manage and reduce pain, physical limitations or disabilities that may limit activities
  • improve overall fitness, health and well-being

Physiotherapy is the treatment of preference for many who suffer from back or neck pain or joint pain such as hips, knees, ankles, wrists, elbows or shoulders. Physiotherapy has proven to be effective in the treatment and management of: arthritis diabetes spinal cord injury range of respiratory conditions stroke and traumatic brain injury offering those afflicted, with techniques to acquire and maintain an optimum level of function and pain free living.

Physiotherapy @ Santé

At your initial visit, your physiotherapist will conduct an initial assessment, history and a physical evaluation. This will be followed by your first treatment so you can immediately benefit from your first experience @ Santé Group.

Treatment itself can vary depending on the type of in-jury with which you are presenting. This may involve education on your injury and how to optimize recovery, manual therapy (hands on treatment), physical modali-ties (ultrasound treatment, electrical muscle stimula-tion), and an exercise program.

Duration & Frequency of appointments — New physiotherapy patients have 1-hour assessments and follow up treatments are 30-minutes. All appointment times are one-on-one with your physiotherapist.

The number of sessions you'll need depends on your condition. The initial visit gives your physiotherapist the information they need to assess your treatment course. Your therapist will discuss this with you after your ini-tial assessment.

What to bring with you — We ask our patients to wear clothing appropriate to the type and area of injury. Shorts and a t-shirt or tank top are usually sufficient. Gowns and shorts are available.

Please bring any test reports or other medical documentation you feel may be helpful in your treatment planning.

If your condition is related to a work injury or an auto accident, we require your case manager's name and contact information, your claim.

Physiotherapists:

Karen Peronilla
RPT (Registered Physiotherapist)
Certified Physiotherapist in Ontario
Registered for Independent Practice with the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario (CPO)

Educational Summary:

  • Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy, De La Salle University, Cavite Philippines , 1996
  • Thompson Rivers University - Open Learning, Kamloops British Columbia, May 2007- July 2008
       - Courses: Understanding Research in HEAL
       - Health Policy
       - Issues in Health Care

Clinical Experience
Physiotherapist

  • San Juan de Dios Hospital, Pasay City Philippines November 1996 - January 1998
       - performed evaluations and established treatment plans
       - performed treatments for both in-patients & out-patients

Areas of Expertise:

  • Cerebrovascular Accidents
  • Motor Vehicle Accidents
  • Spinal Cord Injuries
  • sports-related injuries
  • pediatric conditions
  • collaborated with other members of the rehabilitation team in designing patient care programs
  • participated in case studies to identify patient's individual needs and determine effectiveness of intervention

Fitness Instructor

  • Slimmers' World International, Makati City Philippines January 1996 - October 1996
       - designed exercise programs based on initial assessment and goals of client

Instructor in Elderly and Child Care

  • Center for Training and Development, Manila Philippines; June 1999 - December 1999
       - trained students on how to best assist their clients in the performance of activities of daily living while putting into      consideration their client's physical and/or mental capabilities

Physiotherapy Frequently Asked Questions

What is physiotherapy?

Physiotherapy is a form of health care that prevents, identifies, corrects and alleviates acute or prolonged movement dysfunction. The primary objective of physiotherapy is to promote optimum health and function. It is one of the oldest healthcare professions, and an important part of total health care.
Canadian Physiotherapy Association

Physiotherapy is a major healthcare profession practiced by university-educated, highly trained individuals who are active members of the health care team. Physiotherapy is a key to mobility, an independent lifestyle and wellness.
Canadian Physiotherapy Association

What is a physiotherapist / physical therapist?

A physiotherapist is a rehabilitation expert dedicated to drug-free pain control and to working with patients to achieve maximum return to function and recovery from injury.
Ontario Physiotherapy Association

A physiotherapist is a graduate of a recognized school of physiotherapy. There are over 6,100 registered physiotherapists in Ontario. To enter the profession, physiotherapists must graduate from an accredited university degree programme and secure a licence by successfully completing the national examination.
Canadian Physiotherapy Association

What do physiotherapists do?

Physiotherapists test and measure the functioning of the musculo-skeletal, neurological, pulmonary and cardiovascular systems; and treat physical problems caused by illness, injury or birth defect. While much of physiotherapy is rehabilitation from injury or illness, physiotherapists prefer to practice preventive health care.
Canadian Physiotherapy Association

Physiotherapists are key members of the healthcare team. They work in close co-operation with physicians, psychologists, educators, and a variety of health care professionals.
Canadian Physiotherapy Association

In what areas do physiotherapists practice?

Physiotherapists practice in many different clinical areas including:

  • Orthopaedics – e.g. arthritic knee, sore back, post total hip replacement surgery

  • Sports injuries – e.g. sprained ankle, rotator cuff tendonitis, post knee ligament surgery

  • Neurology –e.g. strokes, diseases like Parkinson's and Multiple Sclerosis

  • Paediatrics – e.g. developmental disabilities like Cerebral Palsy, and orthopaedic problems like torticollis

  • Cardiac Rehab – e.g. after a heart attack

  • Respiratory – e.g. Cystic Fibrosis, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, heart and lung transplants

  • Physical Medicine – e.g. amputees, spinal cord injuries

In hospital settings, new physiotherapists often rotate from area to area. Otherwise, physiotherapists tend to stick to one area and gain increasing expertise.

Where do physiotherapists work?

Physiotherapists are employed in a broad range of settings: acute and extended care hospitals; rehabilitation and mental health centers; private clinics; government and community agencies; educational institutions; sports and recreation centres; and business and industry.
Ontario Physiotherapy Association

Physiotherapists practice in many different settings including:

  1. Hospitals – e.g. H.D.H. clinics, K.G.H. inpatients, St. Mary's of the Lake inpatients and outpatients

  2. Private practice

    1. those partially funded by O.H.I.P. e.g. Blaser's

    2. those with no O.H.I.P. funding

  3. Long term care

    1. publicly owned e.g. Rideaucrest Home

    2. privately owned e.g. Helen Henderson Care Centre

  4. Home care – e.g. Community Care Access Centre funded by the provincial government

  5. Corporate settings– none in Kingston with physiotherapists

  6. Schools – e.g. Child Development Centre out of H.D.H. serves local schools

  7. Community clinics– none in Kingston with physiotherapists

  8. Prisons – e.g. Kingston Penitentiary

  9. The Canadian Forces – e.g. C.F.B. Kingston, the Royal Military College

  10. Research – e.g. Queen's University

  11. Academic – e.g. Queen's University

  12. Third World Countries – e.g. with the Canadian International Development Agency (C.I.D.A.)

What education do physiotherapists have?

Physiotherapists are university educated professionals. The physiotherapy programme at most universities in Canada has recently converted to a professional master's degree requiring two years of university, after having already completed a four year undergraduate programme with the relevant prerequisite courses.

In Canada there are physiotherapy programmes at Dalhousie, McGill University, University of Ottawa, Queen's University, University of Toronto, McMaster, University of Western Ontario, University of Manitoba, University of Saskatchewan, University of Alberta, and University of British Colombia.

Of interest, there is a school of physiotherapy for visually impaired students in England.

During the course of their university programme, students do internships in clinical settings, just like physicians do, in order to gain clinical skills.

After successfully completing a master's degree, prospective physiotherapists must pass a national exam, with both written and practical components, in order to qualify to practice as a physiotherapist.

After beginning practice, physiotherapists further their knowledge and clinical skills by taking continuing education courses on an ongoing basis.

Physiotherapists can also obtain a research master's degree and a doctoral degree.

Who regulates physiotherapists?

Some health practitioners in Ontario are regulated and some are not.

There are about twenty groups of regulated health practitioners in Ontario, including, for example, physiotherapists, physicians, occupational therapists and speech and language pathologists. Each group is regulated by its own college, a body at arms length from the government whose mandate is to protect the public.

Physiotherapists in Ontario are regulated by the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario. The College itself consists of members of the public and physiotherapists. It has both elected and appointed representatives.

The College of Physiotherapists of Ontario sets scopes of practice and standards of practice for physiotherapists. They have quality assurance programmes for and on-site audits of their members to ensure that practicing physiotherapists are competent. They rule on complaints against physiotherapists and may discipline them.

The titles “Physiotherapist” and “Physical Therapist” (or the same titles in another language) are protected titles under the law. In order to call themselves a physiotherapist or physical therapist, a person must be registered with the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario. The College maintains a current list of physiotherapists registered to practice in Ontario.

Some health practitioners are not regulated, including, for example, acupuncturists and naturopaths. There is no one to control what they do. There is no one for the public to make complaints to and no process for recourse. There is no such thing as a “Registered Acupuncturist” in Ontario – anyone can call themselves an acupuncturist.


How do I find a good physiotherapist?

All physiotherapists registered with the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario should be competent. However, like all professions, some physiotherapists are better than others. It is difficult for members of the public to know which physiotherapists are “good” ones. Word of mouth can certainly be useful. Ask your friends, neighbours, and family physician, etc. if they have any experience with a good physiotherapist.

Once you contact a specific physiotherapy clinic, don't be afraid to ask the reception staff how long your prospective physiotherapist has been practicing, what areas of special interest they have, or if you could see a copy of their curriculum vitae which should include a list of their continuing education courses.

Do I need a referral to see a physiotherapist?

Physiotherapists in Ontario are regulated by the Regulated Health Professions Act (RHPA). They are primary care practitioners – that means they don't need a referral from a physician or anyone else to see a patient. Patients can go directly to a physiotherapist of their own accord.

There are only two situations in which a patient needs a referral from a physician in order to see a physiotherapist:

  1. if they are seeing a physiotherapist in a public hospital. (The Public Hospitals Act has not kept pace with current legislation governing physiotherapists and still requires a physician's referral to render physiotherapy services to a patient.)

  2. if they are seeing a physiotherapist who will bill O.H.I.P. for treatments rendered.(The regulations in the Health Insurance Act have not kept pace with current legislation governing physiotherapists and still require a physician's order to bill O.H.I.P. for services rendered by a physiotherapist to a patient.)

A physiotherapist must assess each one of their patients and make their own conclusion about the physical findings. Physiotherapists, not the physician, are responsible for the assessment, reassessments and treatments, even if the patient was referred to the physiotherapist by a physician.

Who pays for physiotherapy?

Unfortunately, Ontario's health care system is not only a two tiered system but, in fact, is a three tiered system. There are three tiers when it comes to paying for physiotherapy services.

In tier one, the patient does not pay anything out of their own pocket. Our taxes (i.e. the Ontario government) pay the entire cost of the physiotherapy service.

In tier two, the patient (or their insurer) pays a portion of the cost of the physiotherapy service and the Ontario government pays a portion.

In tier three, the patient (or their insurer) pays the entire cost of the physiotherapy service.

There are four general sectors of physiotherapy service. Each sector may have different tiers.

In-patient

    There is usually only one tier in this sector.

    Tier One

      Our taxes pay for the cost of physiotherapy delivered to hospital in-patients since these services are funded by the global budget of the hospital (i.e. the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care).

Out-patient

    This sector has three different tiers.

    Tier One

    1. Hospitals
      Our taxes pay for the cost of physiotherapy delivered in hospitals to out-patients since these visits are funded by the global budget of the hospital (i.e. the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care). Generally speaking, waiting lists are very long.
      (note: some hospitals rent their space out to private clinics and some hospitals run other services that bring in revenue to the hospital. They may supply a particular service that is paid for by third party payors – such as physiotherapy for victims of motor vehicle accidents paid for by auto insurance companies – even though the service is supplied by physiotherapists whose salary is paid with public funds.)

    2. "Designated Physiotherapy Clinics" (practices with O.H.I.P. billing rights)
      Our taxes pay for the cost of physiotherapy delivered in some of these 94 clinics since the clinics bill O.H.I.P. (i.e. the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care) for each visit. The amount they bill O.H.I.P. is the only revenue they choose to receive for each visit. Therefore, they usually tend to see high numbers of patients per hour, spending less time per patient.

    Tier Two

      Designated Physiotherapy Clinics” (practices with O.H.I.P. billing rights)
      Our taxes pay a portion of the cost of physiotherapy delivered in some of these 94 clinics since the clinics bill O.H.I.P. (i.e. the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care) for each visit. The amount they bill O.H.I.P. is only part of the revenue they choose to receive for each visit. The remaining portion is paid for by the individual (or their insurer). Therefore, they usually tend to see fewer patients per hour, spending more time per patient. Generally speaking, waiting lists are short or non-existent.

    Tier Three

      Other Private Practices (practices without O.H.I.P. billing rights)
      The individual patient (or their insurer) pays the entire cost of each physiotherapy visit. Generally speaking, waiting lists are very short or non-existent.

At Home

    This sector also has three different tiers.

    Tier One

      Community Care Access Centres (C.C.A.C.)
      Our taxes pay for the cost of physiotherapy delivered by “home care” since these home visits are funded by the global budget of the C.C.A.C. (i.e. the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care). Generally speaking, waiting times can be long.

    Tier Two

      Designated Physiotherapy Clinics” (practices with O.H.I.P. billing rights)
      Our taxes pay for a portion of physiotherapy delivered by some of these 94 clinics since the clinics bill O.H.I.P. (i.e. the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care) for each visit. The amount they bill O.H.I.P. is only part of the revenue they choose to receive for each visit. The remaining portion is paid for by the individual (or their insurer). It would not be financially feasible to deliver physiotherapy at an individual home without this portion paid by the patient (or their insurer). Generally speaking, waiting times are short or non-existent.

    Tier Three

      Other private practices (practices without O.H.I.P. billing rights)
      The individual patient (or their insurer) pays the entire cost of each physiotherapy visit. Generally speaking, waiting times are very short or non-existent.

Retirement Homes

    This sector also has three different tiers.

    Tier One

    1. Community Care Access Centres (C.C.A.C.)
      Our taxes pay for the cost of physiotherapy delivered by “home care” since these retirement home visits are funded by the global budget of the C.C.A.C. (i.e. the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care). Generally speaking, waiting times can be long.

    2. Designated Physiotherapy Clinics” (practices with O.H.I.P. billing rights)
      Our taxes pay for the cost of physiotherapy delivered by some of these 94 clinics since the clinics bill O.H.I.P. (i.e. the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care) for each visit. The amount they bill O.H.I.P. is the only revenue they choose to receive for each visit. Therefore, they usually tend to see high numbers of patients per hour, at the same location, spending less time per patient, with a significant portion of the treatment often assigned to Physiotherapist Support Personnel. Waiting times can be long because of a shortage of physiotherapists working in this area.

    Tier Two

      Designated Physiotherapy Clinics” (practices with O.H.I.P. billing rights)
      Our taxes pay for a portion of physiotherapy delivered by some of these 94 clinics since the clinics bill O.H.I.P. (i.e. Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care) for each visit. The amount they bill O.H.I.P. is only part of the revenue they choose to receive for each visit. The remaining portion is paid for by the individual (or their insurer). Therefore, they usually tend to see fewer patients per hour, spending more time per patient and do not make use of Physiotherapist Support Personnel at all or to any great extent. Generally speaking, waiting times are short or non-existent.

    Tier Three

      Other private practices (practices without O.H.I.P. billing rights)
      The individual patient (or their insurer) pays the entire cost of each physiotherapy visit. Generally speaking, waiting times are very short or non-existent.

Long-Term Care Homes

    This sector also has three different tiers.

    Tier One

    1. Community Care Access Centres (C.C.A.C.)
      Our taxes pay for the cost of physiotherapy delivered by “home care” since these long-term care home visits are funded by the global budget of the C.C.A.C. (i.e. the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care). Generally speaking, waiting times can be long.

    2. Physiotherapy providers using the block funding model
      Our taxes pay for the cost of physiotherapy delivered by a physiotherapy service provider who has signed a contract with a long-term care home and the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. These home visits are funded by block funding from the Ministry rather than per-visit funding. Generally speaking, waiting times are short or non-existent.

    3. Designated Physiotherapy Clinics” (practices with O.H.I.P. billing rights)
      Our taxes pay for the cost of physiotherapy delivered by some of these 94 clinics since the clinics bill O.H.I.P. (i.e. the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care) for each visit. The amount they bill O.H.I.P. is the only revenue they choose to receive for each visit. Therefore, they usually tend to see high numbers of patients per hour, at the same location, spending less time per patient, with a significant portion of the treatment often assigned to Physiotherapist Support Personnel. Waiting times can be long because of a shortage of physiotherapists working in this area.

    Tier Two

      Designated Physiotherapy Clinics” (practices with OHIP billing rights)
      Our taxes pay for a portion of physiotherapy delivered by some of these 94 clinics since the clinics bill O.H.I.P. (i.e. Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care) for each visit. The amount they bill O.H.I.P. is only part of the revenue they choose to receive for each visit. The remaining portion is paid for by the individual (or their insurer). Therefore, they usually tend to see fewer patients per hour, spending more time per patient and do not make use of Physiotherapist Support Personnel at all or to any great extent. Generally speaking, waiting times are short or non-existent.

    Tier Three

      Other private practices (practices without O.H.I.P. billing rights)
      The individual patient (or their insurer) pays the entire cost of each physiotherapy visit. Generally speaking, waiting times are very short or non-existent.


What are the benefits of physiotherapy?

Physiotherapists focus first and foremost on resolving pain, stabilizing an injury or condition and preventing it from getting worse. Then we focus on restoring strength, movement and function as much as possible. Our ultimate goal is to enable our patients to manage their own physical well-beingindependently.

The sooner the treatment of an injury or condition begins, the better. Early intervention prevents a condition from becoming chronic, keeps muscle and other soft tissue structures from weakening through disuse, speeds healing and, above all, increases the chances of full recovery.

Physiotherapy Treatment, Physiotherapists, Physiotherapy, Ajax, Pickering, Whitby, Durham Region, Sante Group HealthCare

 


Physiotherapy Treatment, Physiotherapists In Ajax, Pickering, Whitby and Durham Region